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Friday, Feb 23

00

The Flu Outbreak May Be Easing. Here Are the Latest Numbers.

The infection rate has begun to decline, but there are likely to be many deaths before the flu season finally ends.

21

Patients Eagerly Awaited a Generic Drug. Then They Saw the Price.

Teva Pharmaceuticals announced it would sell a “lower-cost” alternative to Syprine, an old drug that costs more than $21,000. But the new generic version costs nearly as much.

20

Wealth Matters: For Executives, Addiction Recovery in the Lap of Luxury

www.nytimes.com

As the opioid crisis tightens its grip, an industry has sprung up to offer recovery programs for wealthy executives who seek treatment in a discreet environment.

Trump Blames Video Games for Mass Killings. Researchers Do Not.

www.nytimes.com

“I’m hearing more and more people say the level of violence on video games is really shaping young people’s thoughts,” the president said on Thursday.

18

U.K. Moves Toward Making Adults Presumed Organ Donors

Dozens of countries have tried to address shortages for transplants with an “opt out” system that assumes consent.

15

Global Health: Measles Cases in Europe Quadrupled in 2017

Outbreaks across the continent infected 21,000 and killed at least 35 children, leading some governments to crack down on vaccine compliance.

13

Ask Well: Can Being Cold Make You Sick?

www.nytimes.com

A reader asks: Can you get sick just from sitting in an overly air-conditioned room or going out without a jacket? Or do you need to actually catch a virus?

12

Olympic Cross-Country Skiers Eat 8,000 Calories a Day. It’s Exhausting.

Cross-country skiers require, on average, more daily calories than any other type of athlete. But the constant need to eat can take over their lives.

02

Opening Mental Hospitals Unlikely to Prevent Mass Shootings, Experts Say

Spree killers may be angry and troubled, but few have shown symptoms that would have landed them in mental hospitals.

Thursday, Feb 22

00

Catherine Wolf, 70, Dies; Studied How People and Computers Interact

www.nytimes.com

A leader in IBM’s development of a speech-recognition system, she relied on her laptop to communicate after Lou Gehrig’s disease left her paralyzed.

13

Eating Fast May Raise Obesity Risk

Going to sleep within two hours of eating dinner and snacking after dinner were also associated with obesity, but skipping breakfast was not.

Ask Well: How Our Beliefs Can Shape Our Waistlines

www.nytimes.com

Believing in your healthful habits is a healthful habit in itself.

Wednesday, Feb 21

22

Opioids Tied to Risk of Fatal Infections

www.nytimes.com

People with invasive pneumococcal disease were 62 percent more likely to be using opioids.

Working Nights May Raise Diabetes Risk

The more often people worked nights, the more likely they were to have Type 2 diabetes.

20

Tech We’re Using: Limiting the Influence of Tech When You Report on It

How Natasha Singer, a tech reporter at The Times, uses tech when she chronicles the industry’s effect on education, privacy and our health.

13

Phys Ed: How Exercise May Help the Memory Grow Stronger

Stress weakens the brain’s ability to learn and retain information, but exercise may counteract those effects by bolstering communication between brain cells.

10

How to Manage Stress Like an Olympic Biathlete

www.nytimes.com

The pressure of an intense physical race combined with methodical target shooting gives biathletes a unique perspective on coping with stress.

03

Albertsons Is Buying Rite Aid. Walmart’s Stock Falls. There’s a Common Rival.

The grocery chain’s deal and the retail giant’s drop in profits are the latest signs of the pressure that Amazon is putting on traditional businesses.

Tuesday, Feb 20

23

The Key to Weight Loss Is Diet Quality, Not Quantity, a New Study Finds

People who cut back on added sugar, refined grains and processed foods lost weight without worrying about calories or portion size.

13

Short-Track Speedskaters Are Lopsided

They spend hours torqued to the left as they speed around a tight oval. As a result, their bodies are asymmetrical, with much of their right sides bulkier.

Monday, Feb 19

00

As Some Got Free Health Care, Gwen Got Squeezed: An Obamacare Dilemma

President Trump’s efforts to undermine the health law have widened the gap between those who get government aid and those who don’t, deepening resentments.

21

Günter Blobel, Nobel Laureate Who Found Cell ‘ZIP Codes,’ Dies at 81

www.nytimes.com

Dr. Blobel, at Rockefeller University, discovered that proteins in any given cell carry signals that guide them to where they can do their beneficial job.

18

Doctors Said Immunotherapy Would Not Cure Her Cancer. They Were Wrong.

Scientists are racing to understand why immunotherapy drugs have worked for a few cancer patients when the medicines should have had no effect.

16

Tech Tip: Finding Closed-Caption Content Online

www.nytimes.com

Many streaming video providers offer movies and television shows with embedded text descriptions for those who cannot hear the words being spoken.

13

Personal Health: Contraception for Teenagers

Although teenage pregnancy rates have declined, too many teens still use birth control methods incorrectly or inconsistently.

12

The New Health Care: How Dental Inequality Hurts Americans

Lack of dental care through Medicaid not only harms people’s health, but has negative economic implications as well.

Trending: Most Sunscreens Can Harm Coral Reefs. What Should Travelers Do?

Avoiding non-biodegradable sunscreen may be the one solution to coral bleaching travelers have the most immediate and direct influence over.

Saturday, Feb 17

22

Man Crashes Truck Into Planned Parenthood Clinic, Police Say

www.nytimes.com

A suspect was charged after three people, including a pregnant woman, sustained minor injuries in the crash. The authorities would not comment on a motive.

21

Using Art to Tackle Diabetes in Youth

The Bigger Picture campaign uses spoken-word poems and music videos to highlight how Type 2 diabetes impacts communities.

15

The New Old Age: America at Home: Grandparents in the Attic, Children in the Basement

Multigenerational and shared housing arrangements are on the rise, reversing a decades-long trend.