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Business at NPR

Saturday, Oct 20

17

Sears Is Fading, But Memories Of Its Mail-Order Homes Endure

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In the early 1900s, Sears sold thousands of homes around the U.S. through its mail-order catalogs. Many of those houses are still around, and their owners are saddened by the retailer's bankruptcy.

Friday, Oct 19

23

Tears For Sears

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A storied American retailer has filed for bankruptcy.

14

After ICE Raid, A Shortage Of Welders In Tigertown, Texas

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In August, immigration officials hauled off 150 workers from a northeast Texas plant — one of ICE's largest operations in a decade. Now the employer is pushing back.

12

Examining The Close Ties Between Saudi Arabia And Silicon Valley

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Steve Inskeep talks with writer Anand Giridharadas about the relationship between Silicon Valley and Saudi Arabia. The presumed killing of a Saudi journalist raises concerns about the investments.

11

A Rural Colorado Coal County Was Struggling. Then A Tech Company Brought New Jobs

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For the first time in years, Delta County in western Colorado is experiencing population growth, one indicator that rural Americans are increasingly feeling optimistic about their economic future.

StarKist Pleads Guilty To Price Fixing In Alleged Collusion In Canned Tuna Industry

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Three companies — StarKist, Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee — are accused by the government of conspiring to keep their canned tuna prices high.

Thursday, Oct 18

00

Sears And The Future Of American Malls

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The Sears bankruptcy highlights the struggle that many suburban malls face, especially when an big anchor retailer shuts down. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with former Sears Canada CEO Mark Cohen about malls in the post-Sears era.

23

Beating Bollywood

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Amazon and Netflix are trying to take on India. But, so far a Hollywood ending, south-Asian style, has eluded them.

20

'Times' Journalists Puncture Myth Of Trump As Self-Made Billionaire

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Investigative reporters Susanne Craig and David Barstow say the president received today's equivalent of $413 million from his father's real estate empire, through what appears to be tax fraud.

16

As Brexit Deadlines Loom, May Says U.K. Considering A Longer Transition Period

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EU leaders have called off a planned November summit on the next phase of Brexit discussions, due to a lack of progress.

15

Bye-Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change

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A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?

13

Alexa Is Right Up There With Mom, Dad And Cat

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CNN business editor Samantha Murphy Kelly writes that her son's early vocabulary may be a sign of the times. He mastered "mom," "dad" and "cat." The fourth word he recognized? "Alexa."

12

FCC Chastises Cellphone Carriers Slow To Restore Service In Florida

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More than a week after Hurricane Michael hit the Florida panhandle, some residents still don't have cellphone service. Verizon has struggled with damage to its fiber optic cables.

EPA Boasts Of Reduced Greenhouse Gases, Even As Trump Questions Climate Science

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U.S. production of heat-trapping greenhouse gases fell 2.7 percent last year. But larger cuts will be needed to address climate change.

Private Medicaid Plans Receive Billions In Tax Dollars, With Little Oversight

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More than two-thirds of Medicaid recipients are enrolled in privately run Medicaid managed care programs. Yet the evidence is thin these contractors improve patient care or save the government money.

Wednesday, Oct 17

23

Gross Dank Product

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Just because marijuana is now legal in Canada doesn't mean the market for it is easily quantifiable.

Watchdog Group Finds Spooky Spotify Ad Is Too Scary For Kids, Causes 'Distress'

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In 60 seconds, the commercial showcases a medley of horror film tropes, including a maniacal doll that presumably kills a group of young people whenever they play a catchy pop song.

The Economics Of Apologies: Why Saying Sorry Isn't Always As Easy As It Seems

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Companies make mistakes, and it turns out there are expensive and inexpensive ways to apologize for them. NPR's Planet Money's looks a study that finds out how apologies really work.

What A 'Hard Brexit' Would Mean For European And U.S. Economies

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NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Financial Times reporter George Parker about how a hard Brexit could affect the U.K., Europe and the U.S.

President Trump Continues His Attacks On The Federal Reserve

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President Trump has ramped up his attacks on the Federal Reserve, the independent board charged with setting monetary policy.

Brexit Talks Stall At 'Moment Of Truth' Summit

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"We need much time, much more time and we continue to work in the next weeks," EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said. This was supposed to be the day leaders would unveil a draft trade deal.

16

Will NAFTA 2.0 Really Boost Mexican Wages?

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The new trade deal signed by the U.S., Mexico and Canada says much of a car should be built by workers making at least $16 an hour. Some experts are skeptical that will happen anytime soon in Mexico.

15

Scotland's $2 Billion Salmon Industry Is Thriving — But At What Cost?

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The growth of the country's farmed salmon sector has reached such a critical point that, if not addressed, may cause "irrecoverable damage to the environment," a government report says.

13

For A Price, Tourists Can Attend An Authentic Indian Wedding

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CNBC reports a company called Join My Wedding allows strangers to pay for a ticket to a wedding, and then get instructions on how to dress and what to do. Some proceeds go to the bride a groom.

12

Are GOP Tax Cuts To Blame For The Jump In The Federal Deficit?

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Noel King talks to David Wessel of the Brookings Institution about the federal deficit ballooning to $779 billion in the just-ended fiscal year. It's a 17 percent increase from the previous year.

Mary Bono Resigns As USA Gymnastics' Interim CEO

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USA Gymnastics has yet another controversy on its hands. Mary Bono, the interim president and CEO, who was hired last week, has resigned. The group is trying to recover from a sexual abuse scandal.

Morning News Break

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Trump again defends Saudi rulers against allegations they had a role in a journalist's disappearance. The federal deficit jumped 17 percent over a year ago. Ebola infections surge in Congo.

02

FCC Chief Calls For Investigation Of Florida Cellphone Service Outages

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One cellphone company says it already had begun crediting customers for the lack of service due to outages in Florida counties hit by Hurricane Michael.

Tuesday, Oct 16

23

How The Sears Catalog Was Revolutionary In The Jim Crow Era

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Retail giant Sears has filed for bankruptcy. Historian Louis Hyman of Cornell reflects with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly on the impact the Sears catalog had for African-Americans during the Jim Crow era.

Major Corporations Distance Themselves From Saudi Arabia After Journalist's Disappearance

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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with New York Times columnist Andrew Ross Sorkin about his coverage of the Saudi conference losing big name attendees as news of a missing journalist makes headlines.