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Hacker News / npr.org

Thursday, Oct 18

17

Grandma Was Right: Sunshine Helps Kill Germs Indoors

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All kinds of bacteria live with us indoors, and some can make us sick. A new study shows that rooms exposed to light had about half the live bacteria found in rooms that were kept in darkness.

Wednesday, Oct 17

23

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

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Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people.

Thursday, Oct 11

21

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision

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Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process, which could help accelerate efforts to cure colorblindness and lead to new treatments for diseases.

Sunday, Oct 7

15

China Makes A Big Play In Silicon Valley

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"The Chinese figured out that technology is the key to wealth and power, and the source of technology is still the West for China," says one China and tech watcher.

Wednesday, Oct 3

23

How The Chinese Government Works To Censor Debate In Western Democracies

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China's leaders try to muzzle free expression beyond their borders, inside liberal democracies, when speech contradicts the Communist Party line on issues like the status of Tibet and Taiwan.

Tuesday, Oct 2

Going It Solo: The Complicated Financial Lives Of Freelancers

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For a growing population of independent workers, the flexibility of contract work comes with the headache of dealing with taxes and other issues that employers would normally handle.

Monday, Oct 1

22

Supreme Court Turns Away Billionaire Who Wanted To Turn People Away From Calif. Beach

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The lengthy case pitted surfers against a venture capitalist. On Monday, advocates for public access are hailing the court's decision to decline the case as a victory.

Saturday, Sep 29

14

No Cash Needed At This Cafe. Students Pay The Tab With Their Personal Data

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For free coffee, students can provide their names, phone numbers, email, majors and interests. This information is then provided to corporate sponsors who want to "diversify students' career choices."

Friday, Sep 28

18

Drugmakers Play The Patent Game To Lock In Prices, Block Competitors

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Pharmaceutical companies like Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin, often win patents for incremental changes with debatable value. Now there's a twist involving an opioid addiction treatment.

Monday, Sep 24

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria

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Scientists demonstrate that a "gene drive" can rapidly spread a genetic mutation through a species, perhaps providing a potent new weapon against malaria. But there are plenty of skeptics.

Saturday, Sep 22

14

Workplace Wellness Plans Offer Big Incentives, But May Cost Your Privacy

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Uncertainty over federal standards for these cost-saving programs could trigger different perks for employees, and change what they must do to qualify.

Thursday, Sep 20

12

'Savior Of Film,' Henri Langlois, Began Extensive Cinema Archive In His Bathtub

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One of the most important figures in the history of filmmaking never made a film. Langlois created the Cinémathèque Française, where he preserved and exhibited movies from many countries and eras.

Tuesday, Sep 18

23

Woman Rides Bicycle To 183.9 MPH — A World Record

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Denise Mueller-Korenek, 45, has become the fastest human ever to ride a bicycle over open ground, racing in the draft provided by a dragster.

19

Rice University Says Middle-Class And Low-Income Students Won't Have To Pay Tuition

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Full scholarships are earmarked for all students whose families have income between $65,000 and $130,000. Below that income level, grants will bolster the aid package even further.

Under Pressure, WeWork Backs Down On Employee Noncompete Requirements

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Under scrutiny by the New York attorney general, the co-working giant, which has 3,300 U.S. employees, got rid of legal language that restricted where former employees could work.

Wednesday, Sep 12

13

If 'Free College' Sounds Too Good To Be True, That's Because It Often Is

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More than a dozen states offer what are known as free college programs. But a new review finds states vary wildly in how they define both "free" and "college."

Sunday, Sep 9

14

Infectious Theory Of Alzheimer's Disease Draws Fresh Interest

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Money has poured into Alzheimer's research, but until very recently not much of it went toward investigating infection in causing dementia. A million dollar prize may lead more scientists to try.

Thursday, Sep 6

19

What Happens When A.I. Takes The Wheel?

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In his new book Autonomy, Lawrence Burns, formerly with General Motors, argues that self-driving, electric cars are inevitable. In an interview with NPR, he addresses the now — and the future.

12

Hospitals Prepare To Launch Their Own Drug Company To Fight High Prices And Shortages

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A consortium of hospital systems and three foundations is moving ahead with a nonprofit drugmaker that would produce some of the generic medicines health care facilities need the most.

Saturday, Sep 1

14

How To Get Kids To Do Chores: Does The Maya Method Work?

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Inspired by Maya families where kids happily pitch in, correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff tries to get her 2-year-old daughter to become a household helper.

Tuesday, Aug 28

21

For $450, This Japanese Company Will Quit Your Job For You

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Workers in Japan who want to leave their jobs — but don't want to face the stress of quitting in person — are turning to a company called Exit.

Monday, Aug 27

22

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue

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The human brain isn't just bigger than a mouse brain. It contains at least one kind of brain cell that isn't found in rodents.

Saturday, Aug 25

05

Survival Of The Sluggish: Scientists Find An Upside To A Low Metabolism

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A study of 5 million years of mollusks suggests that laziness could be a good survival strategy: species that have gone extinct had higher metabolic rates than the ones that exist today.

Thursday, Aug 23

21

Beyond GDP

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GDP has been a great indicator, but it may no longer be enough.

Monday, Aug 20

18

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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Plastic trash less than 5 millimeters long is in the things we eat and drink, and the air we breathe. Scientists are just beginning to study where it comes from and how it might affect our health.

Saturday, Aug 18

15

1968 Created The 'Ultimate' Anti-Sport Sport

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Ultimate Frisbee was invented 50 years ago this summer. The sport has its own honor system, known as the "spirit of the game," that can be traced back to the counterculture of 1968.

Tuesday, Aug 14

11

India Aims For The World's Biggest Health Care Overhaul

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Posh private hospitals give world-class care — and serve lattes. At government facilities, cancer patients sleep on the sidewalk. But the prime minister has a plan to help the poor.

Monday, Aug 13

12

To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You Sit

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In the past century, many Americans have lost the ability to sit in a way that doesn't strain their backs. Specialists say we could take a lesson from excellent sitters from other cultures.

Sunday, Aug 12

15

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds

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Laser beams that sweep erratically across crops have shown promise in protecting harvests from loss caused by birds. But researchers are still studying whether the beams may harm the animals' retinas.

Saturday, Aug 11

A Songwriting Mystery Solved: Math Proves John Lennon Wrote 'In My Life'

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John Lennon and Paul McCartney have differing memories of who wrote the music for "In My Life." A mathematics professor has spent 10 years working with statistics to decide once and for all.