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Race at NPR

Monday, Oct 22

12

Justice Department Expands Tribal Police Help, Calling It 'Right Thing To Do'

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The Justice and Interior Departments are expanding a program that connects tribal law enforcement with national crime databases. The initiative has helped solve crimes and register sex offenders.

Sunday, Oct 21

15

The Role Of Identity In Politics

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asks NYU professor Kwame Anthony Appiah about the role of identity — gender, party, class — in politics.

Wednesday, Oct 17

18

Distrust Of Health Care System May Keep Black Men Away From Prostate Cancer Research

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Black men are hit hardest by prostate cancer, but they are underrepresented in research. Researchers held focus groups in three states to understand why.

12

What's Driving Some Asian-Americans To Challenge Affirmative Action?

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Steve Inskeep talks to Hua Hsu, of The New Yorker, about how activism in some Asian-American communities helped propel a lawsuit against Harvard University over its affirmative action policies.

04

In Wake Of Charlottesville, Federal Government Pays To Protect Confederate Cemeteries

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The Department of Veterans Affairs has spent millions providing round-the-clock protection to guard graves and memorials dedicated to Confederate soldiers.

Tuesday, Oct 16

23

Harvard Student Discusses Why She Supports The University's Admissions Process

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NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Harvard University senior Sally Chen about why she supports the university's admissions process as the school defends its policies in court this week.

How The Sears Catalog Was Revolutionary In The Jim Crow Era

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Retail giant Sears has filed for bankruptcy. Historian Louis Hyman of Cornell reflects with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly on the impact the Sears catalog had for African-Americans during the Jim Crow era.

20

Those Raised Fists Still Resonate, 50 Years Later

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Olympic sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos won gold and bronze at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Their raised-fist salute outraged many viewers — and still resonates today.

16

'Frederick Douglass' Is An Extended Meditation On The Legend's Self-Invention

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David W. Blight's opus manages to be both a celebration of a remarkable life and a sober reminder of the many ways in which our terrible times are shaped by those Douglass lived through.

14

Determining Who Is A Cherokee Is More Than DNA, Hoskin Says

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Steve Inskeep talks to Chuck Hoskin, Cherokee Nation secretary of state, about a DNA test that Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren took that shows she has Native American ancestry.

12

50 Years Later, Raised Fists During National Anthem Still Resonate

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In the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, two Americans won medals for the 200-meter race. And then in a move that still echoes, they raised their fists in the black power salute on the podium.

11

Novelist Esi Edugyan On Black Genius And What Comes After Slavery

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The author of Man Booker Prize finalist Washington Black began her new book on a plantation in 1830s Barbados. "I really have no idea where my story is going at the outset of it," she says.

Monday, Oct 15

07

Does Harvard Treat Asian-American Applicants Unfairly? The Case Goes To Trial

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A federal lawsuit alleging racial discrimination in Harvard University's admissions process goes to court this week. It could have big consequences for higher education.

Sunday, Oct 14

00

Through Slavery, Segregation And More, 'La Bamba' Has Been The Sound Of Survival

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Sixty years ago, a Mexican folk tune sung entirely in Spanish became a rock and roll phenomenon. Generations after Ritchie Valens, young Latinos are still harnessing its power.

The 'Young Black Man' Who Reluctantly Became An NRA-Certified Instructor

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RJ Young developed an interest in guns in order to bond with his white father-in-law. The experience is chronicled is his new book, Let It Bang.

13

How 'Bring The Pain' Brought Chris Rock Superstar Fame

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A new A&E documentary highlights the stand-up comedian's breakout HBO special.

01

Code Switch: Transracial Adoptees On Their Racial Identity And Sense Of Self

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NPR's Code Switch podcast looks at race and identity in America. In this episode, NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby talk about transracial adoption.

Saturday, Oct 13

15

Remembrance: George Taliaferro, NFL's First Black Player

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NPR's Scott Simon recalls the life of Taliaferro, who died this week at a nursing home in Mason, Ohio. He was 91.

Friday, Oct 12

23

California Democrats Hope Asian-American Voters Can Help Flip Red Districts

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In conservative Orange County, a growing Asian-American population could have an impact on some key competitive House races in the midterms.

Friday, Oct 5

22

Chicago Police Officer Found Guilty Of 2nd-Degree Murder Of Laquan McDonald

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Officer Jason Van Dyke shot the teenager 16 times in 2014. The case gained national attention after the police dashcam video was released.

Thursday, Oct 4

23

Lawyers Make Closing Arguments In Chicago Police Officer's Murder Trial

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Final arguments were given on Thursday in the murder trial of Jason Van Dyke, who shot teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times in 2014. The killing sparked weeks of unrest and resulted in political fallout.

Wednesday, Oct 3

02

4 California Men Charged With Rioting At Last Year's Rally In Charlottesville, Va.

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The men are said to be linked to a militant white supremacist street-fighting club based in Southern California. "They were essentially serial rioters," said U.S. Attorney Thomas Cullen.

Sunday, Sep 30

15

Race, Gender And Sexual Harassment

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks to Kimberlé Crenshaw about the role of race and gender in the Ford-Kavanaugh hearings and how it compares to Anita Hill's testimony. Crenshaw helped Hill's legal team.

Saturday, Sep 29

00

Backlash Over White Hip-Hop Curator At National Museum Of African American History

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A debate was sparked on Twitter when someone pointed out that the curator of the hip-hop archive at the National Museum of African American History and Culture is white.

Thursday, Sep 27

13

If We Called Ourselves Yellow

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For more than a century, it has been a racial slur. But there's also a movement to reclaim the term. So, what about Yellow?

Monday, Sep 24

22

Dallas Police Department Fires Amber Guyger, Officer Who Shot Man In His Own Home

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Guyger has said she mistakenly entered the wrong apartment in her complex and shot a man she thought was a burglar. She was later arrested and charged with manslaughter.

21

How A Rising Star Of White Nationalism Broke Free From The Movement

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Derek Black once promoted a racist agenda by making speeches, hosting a radio show and starting a website. His change of heart is the subject of a new book, written by journalist Eli Saslow.

12

Ex-State Department Diplomat Criticizes Trump's State Department

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Steve Inskeep talks to former diplomat Uzra Zeya about what she sees as declining diversity at the State Department. She worked there for 27 years but walked away from her job in the spring.

Saturday, Sep 22

13

Lorraine Hansberry: Radiant, Radical — And More Than 'Raisin'

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A new biography of the African-American playwright shows that she was so much more than her most famous work: A Raisin in the Sun.

Thursday, Sep 20

22

The Anthemic Allure Of 'Dixie,' An Enduring Confederate Monument

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Despite its origins in the popular music of the North, the song became the unofficial anthem of the Confederacy during the Civil War and still endures as a divisive symbol in modern America.