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16

Catholic Sexual Abuse Crisis Deepens As Authorities Lag In Response

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History, legal issues and doctrine all contribute to the continuing failure of Catholic authorities to recognize and respond more effectively to sexual abuse scandals.

14

We Need More Than Apologies, President Of Survivors Network Says

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A grand jury in Pennsylvania found that more than 300 Catholic priests sexually abused more than 1,000 victims. David Greene talks to Tim Lennon of SNAP, a network of abuse survivors.

12

Pa. Report Reveals Widespread Sexual Abuse By Over 300 Priests

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A grand jury investigation released Tuesday paints a horrifically detailed picture of decades of clergy sexual abuse of minors in six dioceses in Pennsylvania, dating back to the 1940s.

10

Australian Lawmaker Refers To 'Final Solution' In Push For Muslim Immigration Ban

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In his maiden speech, newly minted Sen. Fraser Anning of the far-right Katter's Australian Party called for a revival of long-rescinded racially based immigration policies.

Tuesday, Aug 14

00

Sex Abuse Problems Persist Inside The Roman Catholic Church

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More than a decade and a half after the clergy sex abuse scandal erupted in the Boston Archdiocese, the Roman Catholic Church continues to have a problem stopping and preventing abuse.

22

Report Reveals Widespread Sexual Abuse By Over 300 Priests In Pennsylvania

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A long-awaited grand jury investigation into clergy sexual abuse details decades of misconduct and cover-up in six of the state's eight Roman Catholic dioceses.

12

Pa. Probe Examined Decades Of Sex Abuse Allegations Against Catholic Church

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A grand jury investigation into clergy sex abuse in six dioceses in the state is to be release Tuesday. More than 300 priests who sexually abused minors, or tried to cover up the abuse, may be named.

Saturday, Aug 11

15

Integrating Sunday Morning Church Service — A Prayer Answered

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The 11 o'clock hour on a Sunday morning is one of the most segregated hours in America, Martin Luther King famously said. Now, one church in Oakland is trying to change that.

Friday, Aug 10

20

Thousands Of Muslims Gather In China To Protest Mosque Demolition

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The brand-new Grand Mosque in Weizhou is slated for destruction. The Chinese government says it lacked the right permits, but worshipers see the demolition as an attack on their faith.

Thursday, Aug 9

12

Chicago Pastor Speaks Out About The City's Deadly Wave Of Violence

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Rachel Martin talks to Ira Acree, an anti-violence activist and Chicago pastor, about the city's recent spike in shootings, and challenges in preventing violence during the summer months.

11

Argentina's Senate Rejects Legalizing Abortion, Dashing Hopes Of Rights Advocates

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After 16 hours of debate, the country's Senate voted 38 to 31 against a measure passed earlier by the lower house of Congress that would have allowed abortions through the 14th week of pregnancy.

Sunday, Aug 5

00

Catholics On Capital Punishment

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Pope Francis has declared that the death penalty is unacceptable in all circumstances. NPR's Don Gonyea speaks with Sister Helen Prejean about the history of the church's stance on capital punishment.

15

Black Pastors And Trump

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Eugene Scott, identity politics reporter for The Washington Post, about the public backlash against black pastors who met with President Trump.

Saturday, Aug 4

Understanding NXIVM, Group Critics Call A 'Cult'

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NPR's Scott Simon speaks with New York Times Magazine reporter Vanessa Grigoriadis about NXIVM. Several top members of the self-improvement company face sex trafficking charges.

14

Brazilians Turn To Evangelical Church In Rural Town Wracked By Drugs And Poverty

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"Churches are taking over the leadership role which was supposed to be in the hands of the political powers," says a Catholic youth group member in the Brazilian town of Central do Maranhão.

Thursday, Aug 2

00

Pope Francis Shifts Catholic Church Teachings To Reject The Death Penalty

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NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Thomas Reese, senior analyst for Religion News Service, about how Pope Francis has changed the Universal Catechism to teach that the death penalty is never admissible.

23

In Pennsylvania, Shadow Of Secrecy Lifting From Decades Of Abuse By Priests

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Accused predators have been named. Confidentiality agreements with abuse survivors have been waived. And soon Pennsylvania courts will release a redacted report on more than 300 "predator priests."

New 'Religious Liberty Task Force' Highlights Sessions, DOJ Priorities

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On Monday the Department of Justice announced the creation of a Religious Liberty Task Force. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Emma Green, The Atlantic reporter, about the Trump administration's legal emphasis on religious liberty.

17

Catholic Church Now Formally Opposes Death Penalty In All Cases

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It's a shift for the church, which used to consider the death penalty an "acceptable, albeit extreme, means of safeguarding the common good" in response to certain crimes.

Monday, Jul 30

18

Australian Archbishop Resigns Over Concealing Clergy Sex Abuse

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Philip Wilson was convicted in May for failing to report child sex abuse by a priest in the 1970s. He had stepped aside from his role but hadn't formally resigned, saying he was planning to appeal.

Sunday, Jul 29

15

Priest Who Says He Was Victim Of Cardinal Theodore McCarrick Reacts To Resignation

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Desmond Rossi says Theodore McCarrick, who just resigned as a Catholic cardinal, sexually harassed him. NPR's Renee Montagne asks Rossi for his reaction to McCarrick's resignation.

Saturday, Jul 28

19

Cardinal Theodore McCarrick Resigns Amid Sexual Abuse Allegations

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McCarrick was a globe-trotting Washington power broker and one of the Vatican's highest officials. He faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse, misconduct and harassment.

Friday, Jul 27

13

Radio Hosts Suspended For Calling New Jersey's Sikh Attorney General 'Turban Man'

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WKXW-FM hosts Dennis Malloy and Judi Franco were suspended after the remarks referring to Gurbir S. Grewal, who became the state's top attorney in January.

Monday, Jul 23

23

Encore: Many Look To Buddhism For Sanctuary From An Over-Connected World

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The amount of time people spend on digital devices is soaring — to the point that several countries treat internet addiction as a public health crisis. But some users are turning to ancient religious practices to be more mindful of their…

Wednesday, Jul 18

22

Muslim Americans Running For Office In Highest Numbers Since 2001

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As many as 100 Muslims filed to run for office this year, according to Muslim political groups, the most since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. About 50 of those candidates remain in the running.

Tuesday, Jul 17

21

Texas Man Found Guilty Of Hate Crime For Burning Mosque

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When fire devastated the Victoria Islamic Center last year, an outpouring of support followed, with neighboring Jewish and Christian congregations offering to host Muslim services.

10

Late Mother Teresa's Order Investigated For Child Trafficking In India

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A nun and a worker at a Missionaries of Charity shelter were arrested last week for allegedly selling four infants. India has ordered the investigation of all such facilities run by the order.

04

Creating God

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The world is full of complex religious beliefs. This week, we'll explore how religions have evolved, almost like living organisms, to help human societies survive and flourish.

Sunday, Jul 15

00

A Look At The #MeToo Movement In The Shambhala Buddhist Community

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NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Andrea Winn, who started investigating sexual abuse allegations within the Shambhala branch of Buddhism. Recently, that group's religious figurehead stepped down.

Wednesday, Jul 11

21

Once Militantly Anti-Abortion, Evangelical Minister Now Lives 'With Regret'

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After decades working to block access to clinics, Rev. Rob Schenck says he had a change of heart; he now sees abortion as an issue that should be resolved by "an individual and his or her conscience."