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Stories from NPR at NPR

Friday, Nov 30

10

Amid Trade War With U.S., There Are Signs Of Dissent Among China's Economists

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Sheng Hong of the Beijing-based Unirule Institute of Economics is one who has dared to speak up. Now authorities have shut down his think tank and he's been prevented from traveling abroad.

09

In Gesture To India, Pakistan Offers Easy Access To Sikh Holy Site

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For decades, India's Sikhs have longed to reach one of their holiest sites, a soaring white temple, built on a river bank. A new corridor will allow them visa-free access to the temple.

03

Flash Floods Hit Communities Devastated By Camp Fire

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"The roots and the bottoms of the utility poles are just kind of swimming," Cal Fire spokesman Rick Carhart said on Thursday. Rescue teams worked to save motorists stranded on flooded roads.

Trump's Move To Give States More Flexibility Undercuts Obamacare, Critics Say

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The Trump administration offered states specific examples Thursday of how they could change the way they implement the Affordable Care Act. Critics say Trump's plan could drive up premiums for many.

St. Louis Police Officers Indicted For Beating An Undercover Colleague

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The September 2017 acquittal of a white police officer charged with killing a black suspect led to protests during which the beating outlined in the indictment occurred.

02

What Do African Aid Recipients Think Of Charity Ads?

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Charities often debate how the subjects of their fundraising ads are portrayed — but those discussions rarely include the people in the pictures.

01

GOP Sen. Tim Scott To Oppose Trump Judicial Nominee

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South Carolina GOP Sen. Tim Scott said he would oppose Thomas Farr, President Trump's nominee to the federal bench, due to reports he helped suppress the vote in political campaigns.

Starbucks Moves To Block Porn From Free Wi-Fi Networks

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Patrons have always been banned in theory from viewing pornographic content over the company's Wi-Fi, but there was no technological filter in place. Starbucks will have one in 2019.

Thursday, Nov 29

00

Brazil Pulls Its Offer To Host Major U.N. Climate Summit

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The incoming far-right president said he requested the change. Environmentalists are worried about how the Bolsonaro administration will handle environmental issues.

Loyola's Sister Jean Presented With Final Four Ring After March Madness Run

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Loyola University Chicago surprised Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt this week with an NCAA Final Four appearance ring. The 99-year-old chaplain became a national star after an improbable March Madness run.

Aviation Industry Analyst Discusses Indonesian Air Crash

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with aviation consultant Richard Aboulafia, about the latest details emerging from Indonesia's Lion Air crash investigation.

Jury Begins Hearing Testimony In Charlottesville Trial

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Statements began Thursday in Charlottesville, Va., in the trial of the man accused of using his car to ram counter-protesters during a "Unite the Right" rally in August 2017, in which one person died.

G-20 Summit Set To Begin As Argentina Struggles To Deal With Its Economic Woes

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Argentina hoped the G-20 summit would be a chance to showcase its stability and prosperity. But high expectations for its technocrat president have succumbed to runaway inflation and economic crisis.

Trump Dismisses New Guilty Plea By Former Lawyer Michael Cohen

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President Trump dismissed the new guilty plea by his ex-lawyer Michael Cohen. It comes as he heads to the G-20 meeting in Argentina where he formerly scheduled to meet with Russian President Putin.

Trump Judicial Nominee Set To Fail Amid Voter Suppression Charges

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Sen. Tim Scott, the lone black Republican in the Senate, said he would not support Thomas Farr. The nominee came under scrutiny over possible voter suppression efforts in North Carolina.

What's Behind The Geographical Disparities Of Drug Overdoses In The U.S.

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Opioid overdose deaths are more common in the eastern United States. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with journalist Beth Macy about this geographic disparity.

Temporary Shutdown Of U.S.-Mexico Border Had Large Economic Impact For Businesses

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The San-Ysidro border crossing is the busiest in the Western Hemisphere. The temporary shutdown on Sunday hurt businesses on both sides of the border.

The Average Length Of An American Life Continues To Decrease

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Life expectancy in the United States continues to decline, driven by increases in accidental deaths and drug overdoses. Suicide is on the rise as well.

What You Need To Know About The Latest Big News In The Mueller Russia Investigation

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A busy week has brought a flurry of twists and turns in the often difficult-to-understand story lines of the special counsel's investigation. Here's a breakdown of what happened and what it means.

Teens Sing Their Guts Out In The Scottish Zombie Christmas Musical 'Anna And The Apocalypse'

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The debt John McPhail's tuneful horror comedy owes to Shaun of the Dead proves too deep to clamber out of, but the songs are fun and Ella Hunt's feisty lead performance is charming.

'Never Look Away' Glibly Examines The Intersection Of Art And Autobiography

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Tom Schilling plays a German painter clearly modeled on Gerhard Richter in this melodrama about the lingering costs of war and the ways they inform both art and artist.

In 'Sicilian Ghost Story,' A Boy Goes Missing — And A Girl Goes Searching

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In this haunting, lyrical Italian film, the true story of a horrific mob-related kidnapping is couched within "a love story [that unfolds] in a fairy tale more Grimm than Disney."

23

'Harold Believed In Me': Remembering A College Access Advocate And NYC Schools Leader

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Harold Levy, the former head of New York City public schools, worked to give all students access to college. "Harold wanted to know us, he wanted to hear us," one student says.

Peter Mulvey On Mountain Stage

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STEM-focused musician Peter Mulvey brings his impressionistic 17th album to Mountain Stage.

Space Economics

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From moon missions and space shuttles to public-private partnerships.

What's Ahead For The Towns Where GM Is Shutting Operations

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What happens when General Motors leaves a town? NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Washington Post reporter Amy Goldstein, who covered the exit of GM from Janesville, Wis., for six years.

Trump Administration Appears To Be Lessening Push For Ceasefire In Yemen

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A month ago U.S. officials called for a ceasefire in Yemen — a country on the brink of famine under a Saudi-led offensive. But that call doesn't appear as strong, as Saudis try to take more ground.

Harvard Medical School Dean Weighs In On Ethics Of Gene Editing

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with George Daley, dean of Harvard Medical School, about this week's international summit on gene editing and how the birth of babies with edited genes was received.

UNESCO Designates Reggae As 'Intangible Cultural Heritage'

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The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization has designated reggae music as an "intangible cultural heritage of humanity."

A Timeline Of The Potential Trump Tower Project In Moscow

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The new guilty plea of President Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen is putting new focus on efforts by the Trump organization to develop a project in Russia in 2016 during the presidential campaign.