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21

Republican Voter Suppression Efforts Are Targeting Minorities, Journalist Says

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Ari Berman of Mother Jones warns that a Republican strategy to tighten access to the ballot could have a major impact on the 2018 election. "It could be tainted by voter suppression," Berman says.

20

Fierce, Spiky 'Friday Black' Packs A Big Punch

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Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's intellectually hefty debut works through ideas about racism, about classism and capitalism, about the apocalypse, and, most of all, about the corrosive power of belief.

16

'Glimmer Of Hope' Provides A Blueprint For Launching Social Change

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With a new collection of essays, the 25 founders of March For Our Lives return the subject of the Parkland shooting and gun violence to national consciousness just in time for midterms elections.

12

In Soul Food Cookbook, Chef Carla Hall Celebrates Black Culinary Heritage

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For a long time, the celebrity chef says, she failed to appreciate the food she grew up with. The book reflects her personal journey to embrace the meaning and depth of African-American foodways.

Monday, Oct 22

23

'In My Father's House' Explores How Crime Spreads Through Generations

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Nearly 60 people in the Bogle family have been incarcerated. In a new book, journalist Fox Butterfield chronicles the Bogles' history to show how crime runs in families — and disentangle it from race.

12

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's New Book: 'Friday Black'

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Friday Black, a collection of dystopian short stories, touches on America's struggles with race, class and consumerism. NPR's Noel King talks to author Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah about the book.

Long-Lost Watercolors Of '1001 Nights' Bring New Life To Age-Old Tales

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A long-lost work of Danish illustrator Kay Nielsen is being published for the first time, evoking all the magic of this legendary collection of Indo-Persian and Arabic folktales.

Sunday, Oct 21

17

Futuristic Dreams Turn To Nightmare In 'Electric State'

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In his latest book, Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag uses his ghostly photorealism to create an alternate America overcome by an addiction to technology, by drought, by war and loss and loneliness.

15

A Poetry Hunter On Discovering Lost Poems Of Anne Sexton

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Poetry hunter Erin Singer helped find an unpublished work by the late poet Anne Sexton. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asks the Louisiana Tech English professor about her find.

In 'She Wants It,' Jill Soloway Gets Transparent About Their Life And Work

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The creator of the hit show about a trans woman and her family says patriarchy and white supremacy have a hold on storytelling in Hollywood — and other people want a chance to speak.

14

Barbara Kingsolver Captures The Feeling Of Being 'Unsheltered'

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Kingsolver's new novel opens with a family suffering a slew of disappointments — job losses, aging parents and kids returning home — then jumps back in time to draw subtle parallels with the past.

Saturday, Oct 20

17

Not My Job: Legal Thriller Author John Grisham Gets Quizzed On (Men's) Briefs

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Sure, the lawyer-turned-novelist knows about legal briefs, but what about men's briefs? We'll ask him three questions about tighty whities.

Prejudice Complicates The Course Of Love In 'A Very Large Expanse Of Sea'

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Tahereh Mafi's new novel follows a young Muslim teenager in the years just after 9/11, and what happens when a popular boy in her class falls for her — will she choose love, or self-preservation?

15

Sarah Perry On 'Melmoth'

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NPR's Scott Simon talks with Sarah Perry about her latest novel, Melmoth.

14

You Can 'Destroy All Monsters,' But You Can't Kill Rock And Roll

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Author and musician Jeff Jackson's new novel paints a nightmarish world where the debate over authenticity and selling out has lead to an epidemic of musicians being killed on stage, mid-performance.

An Urban Ink Forager Explains How To Paint With All The Colors Of The Alley

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Concerned about keeping toxic art supplies around his kids, Jason Logan began making his own all-natural inks. He shares his process in a new book — and on a gathering expedition in Washington, D.C.

Friday, Oct 19

23

Little Free Library Creator Todd Bol Dies

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks to author Miranda Paul about Todd Bol, who built the first "Little Free Library" on his Hudson, Wis., deck. Bol died Thursday at age 62 after battling pancreatic cancer.

20

Father And Son Behind 'Beautiful Boy' Share Their Story Of Addiction And Recovery

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David Sheff and his son Nic both wrote memoirs about Nic's meth addiction. Their stories are now the basis of a film starring Steve Carell and Timothée Chalamet. Originally broadcast in '08 and '13.

16

'In The Hurricane's Eye' Focuses On Naval Power's Role In The Victory At Yorktown

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In his new book, Nathaniel Philbrick grabs the reader's head and turns it towards the sea, providing a fresh take on an old story of the Revolutionary War.

Thursday, Oct 18

'The Big Fella' Highlights Babe Ruth's Spot As First Celebrity Sports Star

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Jane Leavy tells the story of Ruth as the first baseball superstar — but also of his roles as movie star, vaudeville performer, barnstormer, pitchman for every conceivable product, and columnist.

14

'Ruth Bader Ginsburg' Reminds Us Why The Justice Is A True Legal Icon

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Jane Sherron De Hart's biography sheds light on challenges the Supreme Court justice faced along the way to the top, both personal and professional, and puts Ginsburg's life in context.

'Melmoth' Bears Witness To Our Worst, Loneliest Moments

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Sarah Perry's new novel isn't subtle — it's full of ominous birds, guttering candles and mysterious figures in gloomy windows. But there's something satisfying about its emotional flamboyance.

01

To 'Make Ink' You Just Need To Look Down Around Your Feet

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NPR's Ari Shapiro explores the city of Washington, D.C., with artist Jason Logan, and author of Make Ink: A Forager's Guide to Natural Inkmaking, to urban forage for materials to make ink.

Wednesday, Oct 17

20

What Would Eleanor Do? 'If You Ask Me' Revisits Roosevelt's Advice Columns

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For 20 years, Roosevelt answered reader questions on topics monumental, mundane and everywhere in between. A new book presents a selection of her essential advice and practical wisdom.

17

'Vietnam' Takes On All Sides With A Critical Gaze

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While historian Max Hastings may break no new ground in his tome, it's how he crafts his story with color, detail and pathos that makes it great — and likely to become the standard on the war.

14

'Heavy' Brilliantly Renders The Struggle To Become Fully Realized

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The book is at once a paean to the Deep South, a condemnation of our fat-averse culture, and a beautiful memoir of being black, bookish, and part of a family that's as challenging as it is grounding.

02

Man Booker Prize For Fiction Goes To 'Milkman' By Anna Burns

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For the first time, a writer from Northern Ireland has won the prestigious award. The story draws on Burns' own experiences during "the troubles."

Tuesday, Oct 16

22

'Hey, Kiddo' Aims To Help Kids With Addicted Parents Feel Less Alone

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Jarrett J. Krosoczka was raised by his grandparents. The author and illustrator says he got a lot of practice telling stories as a kid — "making up excuses for where my biological parents were."

17

'Brief Answers To The Big Questions' Is Stephen Hawking's Parting Gift To Humanity

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The physicist's posthumous book highlights his belief in the rationality of nature and on our ability to uncover its secrets — and a faith in science's ability to solve humanity's biggest problems.

16

'Frederick Douglass' Is An Extended Meditation On The Legend's Self-Invention

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David W. Blight's opus manages to be both a celebration of a remarkable life and a sober reminder of the many ways in which our terrible times are shaped by those Douglass lived through.