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14

'Flights' Is A Trip, If You Like Wandering Off The Edges Of The Map

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Polish author Olga Tokarczuk's new collection is a cabinet of curiosities — surreal, loosely connected stories about the human body, about movement, about two-headed calves and saints' relics.

Tuesday, Aug 14

21

'A Girl's Guide' To Growing Up On A Secretive Missile Test Site

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When Karen Piper was 6, her family moved to the Mojave Desert. In A Girl's Guide To Missiles she describes how her parents designed weapons, but she didn't understand how it all connected to war.

17

A Day At The Beach Won't Be The Same After 'The World In A Grain'

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Journalist Vince Beiser's no-nonsense writing makes light reading of a grim subject, the past and future of sand, but it paints a telling picture of how great a problem lies before us.

14

'His Favorites' Is An Artful Argument For #MeToo — And More

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Kate Walbert's new novel follows a young woman who goes to a posh boarding school after tragedy upends her life — only to find she's no safer there than she was at home.

12

Jazz In The 21st Century Is All About 'Playing Changes'

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Nate Chinen's new book Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century identifies the key players in the genre's resurgence. Chinen's aim with the books is to get the root of the resurgence.

Monday, Aug 13

00

Correspondent Reflects On Nearly 17 Years Of War In Afghanistan In 'The Fighters'

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author C.J. Chivers speaks with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about his new book, The Fighters: Americans in Combat in Afghanistan and Iraq.

23

'Vegetables In Underwear' And Other Laugh Out Loud Book Ideas For Kids

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Children's book author Jon Scieszka shares his kid-friendly reading recommendations. His list includes an irreverent baby book, two great series, and the "Funniest. Stories. Ever."

An Iraq Veteran, Heroin Addict, Bank Robber And Debut Novelist

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Nico Walker is currently in federal prison for bank robbery. That's given him plenty of time to write his semi-autobiographical novel Cherry, which has received glowing advance reviews.

20

Sire Records Co-Founder Seymour Stein Reflects On Life In 'The Pursuit Of Music'

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In his autobiography, Siren Song, Stein writes about how he started out in the music business as a teen before going on to sign groundbreaking artists like Talking Heads, Madonna, Ice-T and k.d. lang.

With Wit And Sadness, 'Baby, You're Gonna Be Mine' Has Echoes Of Salinger

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Critic Maureen Corrigan says Kevin Wilson's funny, raw, beautiful writing reminds her of J. D. Salinger. He starts with a goofy premise and then draws deep emotional truths.

Sunday, Aug 12

17

Like 'Goosebumps?' Here's Another 30 Years' Worth Of Horror For Kids

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From the late '60s to the rise of Harry Potter in the late '90s, horror fiction had a hold on young readers, and there was something to scare everyone, from realistic thrillers to possessed dummies.

15

Twin Private Investigators In 'This Body's Not Big Enough For The Both Of Us'

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Edgar Cantero about his book This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us. It stars A.Z. Kimrean, a brother and a sister — twins — trapped in the same body.

'The Line That Held Us': Noir In Appalachia

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Novelist David Joy, whose books chronicle the rural, working-class South of his own milieu, has penned a new book where a hunting accident triggers a thriller of violent vengeance.

14

'Baghdad Noir' Presents A City Of Diverse Experiences

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Akashic Books' Noir series visits Baghdad for its latest installment, and the talented writers collected here manage to wrest compelling noir from a place that's plenty dark already.

02

V.S. Naipaul, Controversial Author And Nobel Laureate, Dies At 85

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Naipaul was born in Trinidad, and his relationship to his birthplace was nothing if not complicated. He was often criticized for the way he depicted developing countries in his novels.

Saturday, Aug 11

17

'The Victorian And The Romantic' Attempts To Link Writers Through The Ages

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Nell Stevens's new memoir is an uneven but pleasant book that braids her story of doing a PhD amid an uneasy love affair with imaginary scenes from the life of her 19th century research subject.

15

Understanding Horizontal Gene Transfer In 'The Tangled Tree'

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NPR's Scott Simon asks science writer David Quammen about horizontal gene transfer and how it changes how we think about humankind's place in the world. Quammen's new book is The Tangled Tree.

14

Graceful 'Court Dancer' Can't Escape Her Sorrows

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Kyung-Sook Shin's atmospheric, tragic novel follows a beautiful orphan whose dancing skills secure her a place at the Korean court, and later a life in Belle Époque France — but not happiness.

Friday, Aug 10

23

Omarosa Tells NPR She Heard Trump 'N-Word Tape,' Contradicting Her Own Tell-All Book

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Former reality TV star and Trump aide Omarosa Manigault Newman spoke to NPR about explosive allegations in her new book Unhinged, but part of her account changed in the interview.

In Satirical 'Severance,' A Stricken Country Works Itself To Death

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When a disease wipes out most of the U.S. population, Candace Chen is the last one left at the office. Ling Ma began work on the apocalyptic novel right before she got laid off from her own job.

20

David Sedaris On The Life-Altering And Mundane Pages Of His Old Diaries

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Sedaris' Theft by Finding is a collection of excerpts from those diaries. In it, he revisits major turning points, including how he met his longtime boyfriend. Originally broadcast May 31, 2017.

Thursday, Aug 9

14

Spooky And Off-Kilter, 'Come Again' Shows Nate Powell's Virtuosity

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Powell is known for his work on John Lewis' autobiography March -- but his new graphic novel goes in a different direction, digging into family secrets and supernatural horrors in an Ozarks commune.

13

'Lies My Teacher Told Me,' And How American History Can Be Used As A Weapon

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James Loewen's 1995 book explained how history textbooks got the story of America wrong. Now, in a new edition, Loewen champions critical thinking in the age of fake news.

Wednesday, Aug 8

00

What One Journalist Learned From Researching The Causes Of The Opioid Epidemic

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NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with journalist Beth Macy about her new book Dopesick, after she spent the last three years digging into the causes of the opioid epidemic, from rampant overprescribing of painkillers to stigma of heroin addiction…

18

'American Hate' Profiles Survivors, But Also Brings Hope

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Amid the ugly realities of contemporary America, Arjun Singh Sethi's collection of stories affirms our courage and inspiration, opening a roadmap to reconciliation through the stories of victims.

14

'Marvellous Equations' Pulses With Rhythmic Power

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Marcia Douglas's new book imagines a resurrected Bob Marley, living in a clock tower and conversing with spirits — but Douglas also honors and elevates the voices of the women in Marley's orbit.

Tuesday, Aug 7

20

'Into The Hands Of The Soldiers' Explores How The U.S. Contributed To Chaos In Egypt

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New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick says the Obama White House watched Arab democracy fall, and now the Trump administration is embracing Egypt's autocratic president.

15

In 'Everything Trump Touches Dies,' Few Are Spared

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Rick Wilson's book is the story of a Republican Party whose shift toward Trumpism left him furious — and a rant against those who have disappointed him — conveyed with biting, over-the-top writing.

14

Bonding Over Bog Bodies In 'Meet Me At The Museum'

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Anne Youngson's debut novel is the charmer of the summer. Told in epistolary form, it follows a dissatisfied farmer's wife and a lonely museum curator who find it's never too late for a fresh start.

Monday, Aug 6

20

How Can America Reduce Mass Incarceration?

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Julian Adler, co-author of Start Here, and Judge Victoria Pratt discuss alternatives to jail, including community service, social services and even personal essays.