English

Author Interviews at NPR

Tuesday, Aug 14

21

'A Girl's Guide' To Growing Up On A Secretive Missile Test Site

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When Karen Piper was 6, her family moved to the Mojave Desert. In A Girl's Guide To Missiles she describes how her parents designed weapons, but she didn't understand how it all connected to war.

12

Jazz In The 21st Century Is All About 'Playing Changes'

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Nate Chinen's new book Playing Changes: Jazz for the New Century identifies the key players in the genre's resurgence. Chinen's aim with the books is to get the root of the resurgence.

Monday, Aug 13

00

Correspondent Reflects On Nearly 17 Years Of War In Afghanistan In 'The Fighters'

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author C.J. Chivers speaks with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about his new book, The Fighters: Americans in Combat in Afghanistan and Iraq.

23

An Iraq Veteran, Heroin Addict, Bank Robber And Debut Novelist

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Nico Walker is currently in federal prison for bank robbery. That's given him plenty of time to write his semi-autobiographical novel Cherry, which has received glowing advance reviews.

20

Sire Records Co-Founder Seymour Stein Reflects On Life In 'The Pursuit Of Music'

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In his autobiography, Siren Song, Stein writes about how he started out in the music business as a teen before going on to sign groundbreaking artists like Talking Heads, Madonna, Ice-T and k.d. lang.

Sunday, Aug 12

15

Twin Private Investigators In 'This Body's Not Big Enough For The Both Of Us'

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Edgar Cantero about his book This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us. It stars A.Z. Kimrean, a brother and a sister — twins — trapped in the same body.

'The Line That Held Us': Noir In Appalachia

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Novelist David Joy, whose books chronicle the rural, working-class South of his own milieu, has penned a new book where a hunting accident triggers a thriller of violent vengeance.

Saturday, Aug 11

Understanding Horizontal Gene Transfer In 'The Tangled Tree'

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NPR's Scott Simon asks science writer David Quammen about horizontal gene transfer and how it changes how we think about humankind's place in the world. Quammen's new book is The Tangled Tree.

Friday, Aug 10

23

In Satirical 'Severance,' A Stricken Country Works Itself To Death

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When a disease wipes out most of the U.S. population, Candace Chen is the last one left at the office. Ling Ma began work on the apocalyptic novel right before she got laid off from her own job.

20

David Sedaris On The Life-Altering And Mundane Pages Of His Old Diaries

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Sedaris' Theft by Finding is a collection of excerpts from those diaries. In it, he revisits major turning points, including how he met his longtime boyfriend. Originally broadcast May 31, 2017.

Thursday, Aug 9

13

'Lies My Teacher Told Me,' And How American History Can Be Used As A Weapon

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James Loewen's 1995 book explained how history textbooks got the story of America wrong. Now, in a new edition, Loewen champions critical thinking in the age of fake news.

Wednesday, Aug 8

00

What One Journalist Learned From Researching The Causes Of The Opioid Epidemic

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NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with journalist Beth Macy about her new book Dopesick, after she spent the last three years digging into the causes of the opioid epidemic, from rampant overprescribing of painkillers to stigma of heroin addiction…

Tuesday, Aug 7

20

'Into The Hands Of The Soldiers' Explores How The U.S. Contributed To Chaos In Egypt

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New York Times correspondent David Kirkpatrick says the Obama White House watched Arab democracy fall, and now the Trump administration is embracing Egypt's autocratic president.

Monday, Aug 6

How Can America Reduce Mass Incarceration?

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Julian Adler, co-author of Start Here, and Judge Victoria Pratt discuss alternatives to jail, including community service, social services and even personal essays.

12

Time With White Nationalists Recorded In 'Everything You Love Will Burn'

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Noel Kings talks to journalist Vegas Tenold, who spent several years embedded with white nationalist groups — culminating in last year's Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Sunday, Aug 5

15

The Story Of Sand In 'The World In A Grain'

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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with author Vince Beiser about his new book, The World in a Grain. The book tells the story of sand and the crucial role it plays in our lives.

In 'Orchid And The Wasp,' An Unapologetic Heroine Who's No Gentle Flower

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Caoilinn Hughes's new novel introduces a young Irish woman named Gael Foess, who is both exploitative and highly effective. The author says her protagonist is unlikable on purpose.

Saturday, Aug 4

00

Barack And Joe Solve A Murder Mystery

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The new noir novel Hope Never Dies rekindles a presidential buddy-cop bromance in order to unravel a suspicious death in Delaware. It is, to be clear, 100 percent fan fiction.

15

A Rearranging World In 'The Third Hotel'

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Clare, recently widowed, goes to a movie and sees her husband. Is he real? Or does she just think he's real? NPR's Scott Simon talks to Laura van den Berg about her latest novel, The Third Hotel.

Friday, Aug 3

00

'Every Full Moon We Can Howl At Is A Victory,' Says Emil Ferris

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Ferris' graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters won three Eisners, the highest award in mainstream comics, and it celebrates the things that make us all monsters — because monsters are cool.

Thursday, Aug 2

23

Yabbadabba-What? These Aren't The Flintstones You Remember

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When you say The Flintstones, most people think of the old Hanna Barbera cartoons. But a new comic book adaptation keeps the humor, and tackles some heavy themes like capitalism and human frailty.

Wednesday, Aug 1

00

Cartoonist Thi Bui Weaves Together Personal And Political History

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Bui's Eisner Award-nominated graphic memoir The Best We Could Do chronicles her family's struggles in fleeing war-torn Vietnam to immigrate to the United States.

21

Scientists Are 'Spying On Whales' To Learn How They Eat, Talk And ... Walked?

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Paleobiologist Nick Pyenson is dedicated to uncovering the "hidden lives" of whales. He says that 40 million to 50 million years ago, they had four legs and lived at least part of their lives on land.

12

Why Is It Still OK To 'Trash' Poor White People?

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A lot has changed in the U.S. over two centuries. One thing that hasn't? How we talk about poor white people.

Monday, Jul 30

21

Journalist Held Captive By Pirates Says Focus And Forgiveness Were Crucial

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After being kidnapped in Somalia, Michael Scott Moore considered suicide. Then he experienced an "incredible mental transformation" that enabled him to forgive the people who were causing him pain.

Sunday, Jul 29

00

In Memoir 'Crux,' Journalist Crosses Borders To Understand Troubled Father

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Jean Guerrero tells NPR's Michel Martin about her new book, Crux: A Cross Border Memoir, in which she crisscrosses the U.S.-- Mexico border to discover her family history.

15

Religious Fundamentalism Explored In 'The Incendiaries'

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Boy transfers from Bible college. Boy meets girl. Girl joins a cult. Boy tries to save girl. NPR's Renee Montagne talks to R.O. Kwon about her first novel, The Incendiaries.

Saturday, Jul 28

A Thwarted Child Kidnapping Inspired 'Fruit Of The Drunken Tree'

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Growing up amid widespread violence in Colombia, Ingrid Rojas Contreras and her sister were targeted for kidnapping. They were saved by the courage and compassion of a teenager working in their home.

Friday, Jul 27

23

Grim Realities Meet Magic And Absurdity In 'The Wrong Heaven'

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NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with author Amy Bonnaffons about her first collection of short stories, The Wrong Heaven.

20

Stephen King: 'My Imagination Was Very Active — Even At A Young Age'

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Bad things happen in Castle Rock, a new Hulu series based on King's fictional town. King spoke to Fresh Air in 1992, 2000 and 2013 about his career writing horror and his fear of losing his mind.