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CSMonitor.com / USA

Friday, Oct 19

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Poverty plagues forgotten agricultural communities in ...

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A rooster signals the start of the day as workers wearing sombreros and ball caps emerge from the shadows and shuffle past boarded-up businesses in this tiny farm town. They converge on a dimly lit di...

Risk of a new civil war? Today 'us and them' differs from ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Parallels to the 1850s abound, but America is not heading for a second Civil War, historians say. “Then” was an extreme version of “now,” and the results of its extremity may hold lessons for today. F...

21

How Stacey Abrams has gotten within one point of Georgia ...

CSMonitor.com

Stacey Abrams, former Georgia House minority leader and a self-described “nerd,” is on a mission to capture the governor’s mansion. With 1 point separating her and her opponent, Ms. Abrams could becom...

18

States and feds unite to ensure election security in ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

In 2016, the federal government was accused of first refusing to discuss election interference with local officials, and then trying to take control from states entirely. Now, local, state, and federa...

17

Massachusetts residents to vote on transgender rights ...

www.csmonitor.com

On Nov. 6, Massachusetts will become the first state in the US to hold a statewide referendum on a transgender rights law. If passed, the referendum would repeal a 2016 law protecting transgender peop...

07

Russia wrestles with a US-style school massacre in Crimea ...

CSMonitor.com / World

The Russian public reaction to Wednesday’s massacre by a lone shooter at a school in Kerch, in the Russian-annexed Republic of Crimea, will look hauntingly familiar to Americans.

01

Native American group negotiates social change – with a ...

CSMonitor.com

As Native Americans look for better support in schools and more accurate representation in society, a new fund in Michigan is trying a partnership approach that involves give-and-take with communities ...

Thursday, Oct 18

22

Amid complaints of a rigged system, one woman's effort to ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

An era of surging activism is generating new attempts to make the process of drawing congressional maps more impartial – and to give more weight to individual votes. But can an inherently political pr...

Why ‘the Kavanaugh effect’ on midterms is so unpredictable ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Any change attributable to Justice Kavanaugh is likely to be small. Also, nobody can truly predict what it is going to be.

19

How the US became a leading fossil fuels exporter ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Energy Secretary Rick Perry's keynote speech at the World Gas Conference in June opened with a marching band and ended with an exhibition by the Harlem Globetrotters. It was a spectacle befitting the ...

Khashoggi's last column warns of lax attitude toward ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

The Washington Post published Jamal Khashoggi's last column, filed by his translator a day after he disappeared, on Oct. 17. The column warns of Arab governments having free rein to silence the media ...

Wednesday, Oct 17

23

In Florida's kaleidoscopic politics, a window into America ...

CSMonitor.com

Florida isn’t just a potentially pivotal state in this fall’s election. It also has emerged as a kind of microcosm of the nation’s politics, including sharp racial and generational divides.

18

New hires reflect NHL's move toward including women ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

From Buffalo Sabres president Kim Pegula to Toronto Maple Leafs assistant director of player development Hayley Wickenheiser, National Hockey League teams are hiring women for management positions to ...

As demographics change in Orange County, so do its ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Pushy midday shoppers nose their carts through the Korean market, stocking up on bottled kimchi and seaweed spring rolls. A few doors away, customers grab pho to go at a Vietnamese takeout counter. Ac...

17

Florida radio hosts carry on after hurricane Michael shut ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Damage from hurricane Michael forced a Panama City Beach, Fla., radio station to close. But two of its hosts, now without jobs, are still keeping the community informed with updates on recovery effort...

Tuesday, Oct 16

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Pompeo in Riyadh as Saudis face increasing backlash over ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

International pressure continues to grow against Saudi Arabia in the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi as US Secretary of State meets with leaders of the kingdom. Crown Prince Mohammed bin S...

Miles inland, rural counties still digging out after ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Despite being 70 miles from the coast, the town of Marianna, Fla., was hit hard by hurricane Michael: Trees and power lines were knocked down and entire homes destroyed. Amid the chaos, neighbors stri...

Texas Senate race enters the final stretch with third ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz and Democratic challenger Rep. Beto O'Rourke face off in a final debate on Tuesday night in a race that has captured national attention. Senator Cruz has a narrow lead in a ca...

01

High Crime and Misperceptions - CSMonitor.com

CSMonitor.com / USA

Editor's note: This page includes a transcript of episode one, "High Crimes and Misperceptions." To listen to the episode, please visit our landing page.

Monday, Oct 15

22

San Francisco vote on corporate tax puts homelessness in ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

San Francisco has come to be known around the world as a place for aggressive panhandling, open-air drug use, and sprawling tent camps – the dirt and despair all the more remarkable for the city's imm...

Saturday, Oct 13

06

How hurricane Michael could affect Florida's high-stakes midterms

CSMonitor.com

During previous natural disasters, bipartisan cooperation was the order of the day as everyone worked to help those in harm's way. That unwritten code of civility has faded, as seen in Florida, where political gamesmanship continued even…

Friday, Oct 12

00

Will the Khashoggi affair change the course of US-Saudi ...

CSMonitor.com

A president who is generally laissez faire when it comes to other countries’ internal affairs now faces a Congress that is far more critical. Which approach will shape relations with a Mideast ally wh...

19

Under pressure, court allows convicted US pastor to leave ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

The evangelical pastor had faced up to 35 years in jail if convicted of all the charges. Brunson, who has lived in Turkey for more than two decades, was one of thousands caught up in a widespread gove...

18

Washington Supreme Court strikes 'racially biased' death ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Washington State became the 20th US state to end capital punishment via legislation or a court order after its supreme court declared that racial biases impact who is sentenced to the death penalty.

Nevada Senate race to reflect the impact of Kavanaugh's ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Many Republican senators are feeling more confident after the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, but Republican Sen. Dean Heller in Nevada faces a heated debate on gender politics v...

17

After a black legislator quits, Vermont faces hard ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Soon after Kiah Morris became Vermont's first black female legislator in 2014, she began to experience harassment, break-ins, and death threats that led her to resign. Now, Vermonters are asking thems...

01

Cash bail: why some call for changes - CSMonitor.com

CSMonitor.com / USA

Every night in the US, about 450,000 people are in jail awaiting trial.

Wednesday, Oct 10

22

After hitting 'rock bottom' over Kavanaugh, can Senate ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Both sides agree the Kavanaugh fight may have inflicted lasting damage. Still, few are eager for a repeat – and the best time to consider improvements to the judicial nomination process is when there ...

21

Conflict exhaustion or democracy renaissance? The age of ...

CSMonitor.com

Democracies aim to turn political passions into protests and activism. Living through such a time, however, draws on civic reservoirs of patience and goodwill.

18

Disinterred and flown home: the remains of lost US ...

CSMonitor.com / USA

Through advances in technology and new government funding, more and more remains of soldiers killed since World War II are being identified. The process is bringing closure to families who have been w...