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04

The IRS commissioner faced tough questions from Senate Finance Committee

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Senators quizzed IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel about the just-finished tax-filing season and what's ahead for the government's tax collector.

02

What happened at WNBA draft — and what the future of the sport could hold

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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Jemele Hill, contributing writer for The Atlantic, about the 36 new players who were drafted into the WNBA and the future of the sport.

Japanese-American baseball players will bring the game back to a WWII camp

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Volunteers are restoring the Manzanar War Reloctation Center's baseball field. In the fall, Japanese-American baseball players play where many of their families were held during World War II.

In Arizona, political candidates walk a fine line on abortion rights

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Arizona's ban on abortions has affected political races. Republican U.S. Senate hopeful Kari Lake is figuring out how to balance her opposition to abortion rights without embracing a near-total ban.

01

The push to have seniors age in their homes, not hospitals

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More than 10 thousand older adults turn 65 every day. There's growing efforts to make sure they stay in their homes and out of hospitals and nursing homes as they age.

Electronic warfare is interfering with GPS in areas of Gaza

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Electronic warfare connected to the conflict in Gaza is interfering with the global positioning system in a large part of the region.

A church offers asylum seekers a loan

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A church rents apartments for asylum seekers, who pay the church back after an initial buffer period.

Supreme Court hears challenge to a statute used to try hundreds of Jan. 6 rioters

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The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided, with conservatives expressing various degrees of skepticism about the statute used to prosecute more than 350 of the Jan. 6th rioters who invaded the capitol.

Climate change in Catan? New board game version forces players to consider pollution

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The newest version of the popular board game Catan will make players wrestle with a society-wide problem: How do you build, develop and expand without overly polluting the world?

New HBO series looks at Vietnam War from Vietnamese perspective

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NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with actor Hoa Xuande about the new HBO show 'The Sympathizer' — a rare piece of Hollywood entertainment that tells the story of the Vietnam War from a Vietnamese perspective.

Technology and disinformation places U.S. in multiple cold wars, author argues

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to journalist David Sanger about his new book, New Cold Wars: China's Rise, Russia's Invasion, And America's Struggle To Defend The West.

Tuesday, Apr 16

00

Visually impaired Boston Marathon runner and his guide give an update on race

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Nafij Ahmed and Josh Bard ran the Boston Marathon on Monday. Nafij is visually impaired and Josh was his guide for the run. We ran a story about the lead up to the run. This is what happened since.

The massive effort to clear the waterway in Baltimore

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Demolition is underway on the Francis Scott Key bridge in Baltimore. Crews are using fire to weaken the massive structure so it can be removed as quickly as possible.

Iran's attack on Israel marks a significant shift from its usual proxy warfare

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NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Karim Sadjadpour, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about what this escalation tells us about Iran's strategy.

23

What's the key to creating great art? This author spoke to 40+ artists to find out

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NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Adam Moss, author of The Work of Art: How Something Comes From Nothing.

20

Johnson's leadership is under threat in the House over foreign aid bills

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Kentucky Republican Thomas Massie said he would vote to oust Mike Johnson as House speaker if it came to the floor. He told Johnson in a closed-door meeting that he should resign.

14

House set to hold separate votes on aid for Israel and Ukraine after delays

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House Speaker Mike Johnson announced a path forward on aid to Ukraine and Israel after months of delay because of GOP divisions. Iran's attack on Israel increased pressure on Congress to act.

12

ABBA, The Notorious B.I.G. and Green Day named to the National Recording Registry

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Every year, the Library of Congress names 25 "audio treasures" to be preserved permanently. This year's selections range from ABBA and Green Day to World War I-era jazz pioneer James Reese Europe.

02

Researchers have been trying to breed fungus-resistant chestnut trees for 100 years

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We visit an orchard where researchers are breeding Chestnut trees they hope will one day fight off a fungus that's been killing the iconic American tree for more than a century.

25 years after the Columbine shooting: What life now looks like for one survivor

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A survivor of the then-unprecedented school shooting in Colorado struggled for years to understand her own response to trauma and now helps others learn to feel safe.

Why Brazil was able to hold their former president accountable in election case

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NPR's Scott Detrow talks with Omar Encarnacion about former Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro being banned from running for office for eight years due to efforts to overturn Brazil's 2022 election.

01

What good is an EV if you can't charge it? Here's the plan to build more chargers

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How quickly are EV chargers getting built? That's a critical question as the auto industry tries to pull off a switch toward battery-powered cars.

What is known about Jordan's role in downing Iranian drones

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While Israel and the U.S. trumpet their success at shooting down Iran's drone and missile barrage, neighboring Jordan has been coy about the role it played in downing projectiles.

Monday, Apr 15

23

Former President Donald Trump's hush money trial began today

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Jury selection began Monday in the criminal trial against former President Donald Trump for hush money payments made ahead of the 2016 election.

One year after civil war erupted in Sudan, millions of people are in dire need of aid

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A year of war has had a devastating impact on Sudan. The country is suffering the worlds largest displacement crisis and in the grips of a humanitarian disaster, with no sign of a resolution in sight.

Wrexham football club, welcome to League One

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The Welsh soccer club famously owned by North American actors Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney have earned another promotion. Next year Wrexham AFC will play in the third division of English football.

A look at Manhattan DA Alvin Bragg as he oversees Trump hush money trial prosecution

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Alvin Bragg is the first person to bring criminal charges against a former president and the first African American elected Manhattan District Attorney. Bragg faces challenges beyond any one big case.

Renowned Atlanta hip-hop producer Rico Wade dies at 52

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NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Rodney Carmichael from NPR Music about the legacy of Rico Wade, a foundational producer of Atlanta Hip-Hop.

An NBA player missed a free throw on purpose — but he didn't chicken out

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Houston Rockets center Boban Marjanovic intentionally missed the second of two free throws in a game yesterday. In doing so, he won free chicken sandwiches for everyone in attendance.

How Israel is responding to aggression by Iran

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Israel's government is weighing its next steps following the weekend attack by Iran. And in Gaza, there are signs of increased food reaching the north following intense U.S. pressure on Israel.