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20

2018 Revealed Just How Ill-Prepared We Are For Climate Change

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Somini Sengupta, international climate reporter for The New York Times, discusses the dire consequences of rising temperatures, such as drought, famine, disease, war and increased migration.

18

Wisconsin Reservation Offers A Climate Success Story And A Warning

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Climate change is causing more severe flooding around the country, and a disproportionate number of Native American communities are on the front lines.

Tuesday, Aug 14

00

Florida's Gulf Coast Battles Deadly And Smelly Red Tide

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A toxic algae bloom is killing fish, turtles and dolphins and discouraging tourists from visiting Florida's Gulf Coast. It's not the first such event, but it is especially intense.

23

Brigham Young University Geologists Discover Oldest Known Pterosaur Fossil

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A pterosaur is not a dinosaur, but the oldest known powered flying vertebrates. Brigham Young University students and teachers have published the result of their findings of the oldest known fossil.

16

Watch This Native Pollinator Build Her Bee-Jeweled Nest

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Research shows that 400 female blue orchard bees are as effective at pollinating almonds as the more than 10,000 bees in a honeybee hive. But they reproduce slowly and are prone to wandering.

01

Despite FDA Caution, Doctors Say Lasers May Help With Vaginal Pain And Dryness

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The FDA recently warned against using lasers for so-called "vaginal rejuvenation" treatments to reshape or tighten the vagina. But one kind of laser treatment might have gotten a bad rap.

Monday, Aug 13

21

French Theme Park Asks: Crows Can Pick Up Trash, Why Can't You?

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A team of six trained birds — rooks, actually — is collecting paper and cigarette stubs at the Puy du Fou park in western France. They drop the trash into a container in exchange for food.

12

Ambitious 'Human Cell Atlas' Aims To Catalog Every Type Of Cell In The Body

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Already the project has revealed a previously unknown type of cell in the windpipe that might play a role in cystic fibrosis — and lead to a new treatment, scientists say.

04

After 17 Days And 1,000 Miles, A Mother Orca's 'Tour Of Grief' Is Over

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After carrying her calf's corpse for an unusually long time, a "remarkably frisky" Tahlequah, or J-35, as the orca's known, was seen Saturday chasing a school of salmon with fellow members of her pod.

Sunday, Aug 12

15

New Study Sheds Light On Depression In Teens And Parents

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There is a new study on the effect treating teens for depression has on their parents. It suggests just treating teens has benefits for parents.

NASA Launches Spacecraft Toward The Sun

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This morning, NASA launched the Parker Solar Probe. The probe will attempt to get closer to the sun than any other human-made object.

Saturday, Aug 11

Understanding Horizontal Gene Transfer In 'The Tangled Tree'

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NPR's Scott Simon asks science writer David Quammen about horizontal gene transfer and how it changes how we think about humankind's place in the world. Quammen's new book is The Tangled Tree.

The Sound Of The Golf Swing

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Manufacturers work to perfect the sound drivers make when the ball is hit just right. Scott Simon talks with Tom Mase, who teaches mechanical engineering at California Polytechnic State University.

03

In Parts Of California Blanketed With Wildfire Smoke, Breathing Is 'A Chore'

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As fires continue to rage in California, smoke is causing health problems for some residents. Public health officials warn against breathing polluted air.

02

Perseid Meteor Shower Peaks This Weekend — Just Look Up

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The shower will peak late Sunday night and early Monday morning, but you can also catch a good number of meteors in the middle of the night on Saturday. Find a dark spot and let your eyes adjust.

Friday, Aug 10

00

Are You Listening? Hear What Uninterrupted Silence Sounds Like

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Inside the Hoh Rain Forest in Washington state, acoustics experts have attempted to preserve a location free of human-made noise. They call it One Square Inch of Silence.

17

From A Million Eggs, Putting Together Clues About Science's Past And Future

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Egg collecting was once a popular pastime. Now, the pristine specimens in one collection are a key resource for research on a range of topics, from the climate change to changes in bird populations.

12

Families Choose Empathy Over 'Tough Love' To Rescue Loved Ones From Opioids

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Families are starting to adopt an approach that stresses compassion instead of harsh consequences for loved ones with addiction. Their goal? Keep them alive long enough to recover.

03

The Arid West Moves East, With Big Implications For Agriculture

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An imaginary map line dividing East and West illustrates a climate boundary that has influenced how and where people live and work. Its eastward shift could predict changes in farming and ranching.

Thursday, Aug 9

00

Cal Fire Chief Discusses How Firefighters Are Battling California Blazes

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The Mendocino Complex Fire in California is now the state's largest wildfire ever recorded. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Trump Claims California Is Wasting Water That Could Be Used To Fight Wildfires

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The president blamed the intensity of the fires on state environmental policies, incorrectly claiming water that could be used to fight the fires is being pumped into the Pacific Ocean.

23

NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun

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A new NASA probe will get closer to our sun than ever before, to try to solve mysteries like why its atmosphere is so much hotter than its surface.

VP Pence Unveils Plans For New Military Branch In Outer Space

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Vice President Pence unveiled the Pentagon's plans for a branch of the military that could fight in space on Thursday.

White House Describes Military 'Space Force,' Aims To Create It By 2020

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Vice President Pence said in a speech Thursday that the Space Force, which would be the military's sixth branch, will "prepare for the next battlefield" and "a new generation of threats."

22

Sending Letters About Their Patients' Overdoses Changes Doctors' Prescribing Habits

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Many doctors never find out when a patient dies from an overdose. A new study shows that when find out, it can alter the way they prescribe addictive drugs.

18

Scientists Discover The Secret Weapon Of Stomach Viruses

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New research finds that stomach infections, like norovirus and rotavirus, have a special way to get to us hard — and fast. That knowledge could lead to new, more effective treatments.

01

Beloved Baby Eaglet In D.C. Euthanized After Suffering West Nile Disease

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Valor was one of two young eaglets in a nest at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. The tree is monitored 24/7 by a popular webcam. He fell from the nest late last month, and died on Tuesday.

Boxers Or Briefs? Experts Disagree Over Tight Underwear's Effect On Male Fertility

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The jury's still out on whether underwear preference matters to male fertility, but men who wear briefs, or other tight options, were found to have slightly lower sperm counts in a new study.

Wednesday, Aug 8

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Is There A Better Way To Fight Massive Wildfires?

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Massive wildfires in Western states are rapidly depleting funds set aside to fight fires. At the same time, many experts argue our priorities are wrong — we should be spending more on prescribed burns, and less on fighting fires in…

Explore One Of The World's Largest Collections Of Bird Eggs And Nests

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The Western Foundation for Vertebrate Zoology in Camarillo, Calif., houses one of the largest collections of birds eggs and nests in the world. We meet the scientists who run the foundation.