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futurity.org

Monday, May 20

18

‘Robot-phobia’ takes a toll on food and hotel workers

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Using more robots to close labor gaps in the hospitality industry may backfire and cause more human workers to quit, researchers report.

17

Black adults at risk of Alzheimer’s live in more polluted areas

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New research suggests looking at a patient’s address may be just as important for care providers to consider as ordering a brain scan.

16

Copper mining could be a bottleneck in switch to green energy

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Renewable energy’s copper needs are beyond what copper mines can produce at the current rate, researchers report.

Virtual reality stories can spur environmental action

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Virtual reality storytelling could help drive people to take action on environmental threats, according to new research.

Otters use tools to protect teeth when prey is extra crunchy

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Using tools like shells, rocks, and even trash allows sea otters to break apart larger prey without damaging their teeth, a new study shows.

15

System predicts who’s at risk of quitting opioid treatment

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Machine learning can predict who will stop taking buprenorphine, a medication that treats pain and addiction associated with opioid use disorder.

Friday, May 17

16

Why docs shouldn’t do telehealth visits in the kitchen

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What's behind doctors in telehealth video visits can sway how patients feel about the care they receive, research finds.

15

Diabetes in 2 pregnancies seriously ups later diabetes risk

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Women with gestational diabetes have a higher risk for type 2 diabetes later. A new study digs into how that risk evolves over pregnancies.

Jelly sea creature ‘jet propulsion’ could give robots a boost

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Gelatinous sea animals that swim through the ocean in giant corkscrew shapes could inspire new designs for efficient underwater vehicles.

Wednesday, May 15

22

Firefighters may have higher prostate cancer risk

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On-the-job chemical exposures may put firefighters at an increased risk of prostate cancer, a new study shows.

20

Parasitic worm in moose brains adds to species decline

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Parasitic worms infesting the brains of moose are likely playing a role in the animal's decline in some parts of North America.

19

How to protect your dog from dangerous bacterial infection

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An expert has answers for you about dogs and leptospirosis, including how to prevent dogs from getting it and what's next if they do.

AI detects sex-related differences in brain structure

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An AI tool that detects differences in how the brains of men and women are organized at the cellular level, highlights the need for diversity in research.

18

HIV vaccine approach works like GPS

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A new vaccine approach guides the immune system through the specific steps to make broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

Sleep apnea during REM contributes to verbal memory decline

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A study links sleep apnea during REM sleep to verbal memory decline in older adults at risk for Alzheimer's.

15

COVID virus can infect eyes and damage vision

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The virus that causes COVID-19 can breach the blood-retinal barrier, leading to potential long-term consequences for the retina and vision.

Tuesday, May 14

19

Common antibiotic tied to higher death risk in sickest patients

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"In the right context, treatment can be lifesaving, but in the wrong context, it can be quite harmful."

17

Meat prices will likely go up this summer

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A new report provides insights on the future price of beef, pork, and chicken cuts traditionally used for grilling.

Fruit fly testes enzyme could stymie harmful pests

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An enzyme found in fruit fly testes could control bugs that carry disease and harm crops by stunting their ability to procreate.

Dreams help you process bad experiences

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New research suggests that "dreaming after an emotional experience might help us feel better in the morning."

15

New gel could make drinking alcohol less harmful

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A new protein-based gel could one day reduce the harmful and intoxicating effects of alcohol in the body.

Monday, May 13

22

Can citations fight misinformation on YouTube?

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A new browser extension lets viewers and creators add Wikipedia-like citations to YouTube videos. It could help fight bad facts online.

21

The right video games can boost kids’ well-being

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Video games can boost the well-being of children, but only if designers create them with the needs of kids in mind.

Stuff that’s hard for your brain to explain may be more memorable

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A computational model and behavioral study gives a new clue to the age-old question of how our brain prioritizes what to remember.

Discrimination may speed up biological aging

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“Experiencing discrimination appears to hasten the process of aging, which may be contributing to disease and early mortality...”

20

Daylight savings time is bad for your healthy habits

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The onset of daylight savings time is associated with eating more processed snack foods and making fewer trips to the gym.

18

Discovery could lead to new hepatitis B treatments

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Researchers may have found an "Achilles heel" for hepatitis B, which affects about 296 million people and kills about 1 million every year.

17

Night shift work can raise your risk of diabetes and obesity

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“When internal rhythms are dysregulated, you have this enduring stress in your system that we believe has long-term health consequences.”

16

COVID lockdowns linked to increase in overdose deaths

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Lockdown policies intended to curb the spread of COVID appear to have contributed to an increase in drug overdose deaths, researchers find.

How mantis shrimp defend against punches as fast as bullets

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Mantis shrimp punches are very fast, accelerating on par with a 22-caliber bullet. New research digs into how they defend against the blows.