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Economics at phys.org

Friday, Aug 19

22

Surprising attractiveness of hurdle to developing safe, clean and carbon-free energy

phys.org

Scientists have discovered the remarkable impact of reversing a standard method for combatting a key obstacle to producing fusion energy on Earth. Theorists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL…

18

Spatial-network modeling may offer new path to monitoring political hotspots

phys.org

An improvement to a computer model may help scientists better predict the future moves of political factions and locate where they might interact with other—often rival—groups, according to Penn State researchers. Predicting those moves…

10

Chinese city dims lights in heatwave power crunch

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A provincial capital in southwest China has dimmed outdoor advertisements, subway lighting and building signs to save energy, official announcements said, as the area battles a power crunch triggered by record-high temperatures.

09

Implications of global home food delivery revolution

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What's on the menu for today's consumers? Eating in. Globally, people have increasingly been getting their meals delivered by third parties such as DoorDash, Grubhub or Uber Eats. Global revenues for the online food delivery sector have…

Thursday, Aug 18

21

Bioengineering better photosynthesis increases yields in food crops

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For the first time, RIPE researchers have proven that multigene bioengineering of photosynthesis increases the yield of a major food crop in field trials. After more than a decade of working toward this goal, a collaborative team led by…

20

Study reveals changeable tendency of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in dryland

phys.org

Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles play important roles in the prediction of climate change and ecosystem sustainability in the dryland. Climate change has threatened the nutrient balance of dryland ecosystems; however, its impact on soil…

De-extinction company plans to bring back the Tasmanian tiger

phys.org

Colossal Biosciences, a Dallas company pursuing plans to bring wooly mammoths back to the Arctic tundra, is setting its sights on bringing back another extinct species: the Tasmanian tiger.

CRISPR-based technology targets global crop pest

phys.org

Applying new CRISPR-based technology to a broad agricultural need, researchers at the University of California San Diego have set their aims on a worldwide pest known to decimate valuable food crops.

Politicians are getting older, but do voters care? Sort of

phys.org

Good news, Mr. President: A new study from a team of political scientists finds that the age of politicians may not be voters' chief concern when they're deciding who to cast their ballots for.

19

Australia may be heading for emissions trading between big polluters

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Could Australia soon have a form of emissions trading? Yes, if Labor's much-anticipated paper on fixing Australia's mediocre emissions-reduction framework, released today, is any guide.

18

To hit 82% renewables in eight years, we need skilled workers. And labor markets are already overstretched

phys.org

In just eight years time, the Labor government wants Australia to be 82% powered by renewable energy. That means a rapid, historic shift, given only 24% of our power was supplied by renewables as of last year.

Study: A controversial SEC rule did little to rein in excessive CEO pay

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Publicly traded companies are required to disclose the ratio of their CEO compensation to the median pay of their employees—a rule that was adopted beginning in 2018 by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in response to…

Climate change threatens food supply chains with impacts on diet quality, income

phys.org

Modeling shows climate change and extreme weather events will impact food supply chains, with adverse effects on income, food and nutrient availability. Rural communities would be most severely impacted—while more affluent communities…

17

Federal study: New climate law to slice carbon pollution 40%

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Clean energy incentives in the new spending package signed this week by President Joe Biden will trim America's emissions of heat-trapping gases by about 1.1 billion tons (1 billion metric tons) by 2030, a new Department of Energy analysis…

16

Low-income tenants face significant discrimination on Craigslist

phys.org

Low-income families already face an uphill battle in the housing market, but a recent study from a pair of public policy researchers at Northeastern suggests the hill might be even steeper.

10

Canada's Hudson Bay a summer refuge for thousands of belugas

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Half a dozen beluga whales dive and reemerge around tourist paddle boards in Canada's Hudson Bay, a handful of about 55,000 of the creatures that migrate from the Arctic to the bay's more temperate waters each summer.

08

Study confirms that speculation taxes are not an effective tool in curbing house prices

phys.org

As the Ontario housing market enters a potentially volatile phase, new research from the University of Waterloo shows how tax policy has proven ineffective in controlling prices.

Wednesday, Aug 17

22

UK disputes lack of access to EU science research programmes

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Britain has launched dispute procedures with the European Union over its exclusion from the bloc's scientific research programmes, using a mechanism set out in a post-Brexit deal.

Indigenous youth film project turns the lens on nutrition and food security

phys.org

A unique initiative is helping Indigenous people in India exchange knowledge about locally available foods to improve dietary diversity—part of the UN Sustainable Development Goal related to food security and nutrition.

21

Promotion doesn't add up to gender equity at leading accounting firms

phys.org

Often instead of making partner, women in public accounting firms appear to be sidelined into less prestigious, less powerful director positions, a study has found.

20

Fast-growing poplars can release land for food production

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Researchers at Stockholm University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel value chain for production of textile and bio-fuel from fast-growing poplars. By applying sustainable catalysis on these poplars…

New research model illuminates how organs communicate with each other

phys.org

Our many different organ systems are in constant communication with each other. During exercise, for example, muscles send out signals to fat and liver tissue to release their energy sources. While these communication networks play a…

16

Scientists bring cultured meat closer to your kitchen table

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Researchers at UCLA have created an edible particle that helps make lab-grown meat, known as cultured meat, with more natural muscle-like texture using a process that could be scaled up for mass production.

11

US cuts water supply for some states, Mexico as drought bites

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Water supplies to some US states and Mexico will be cut to avoid "catastrophic collapse" of the Colorado River, Washington officials said Tuesday, as a historic drought bites.

China heat wave pushes up prices as hens lay fewer eggs

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Scorching temperatures in eastern China have pushed up egg prices because hens are laying fewer in a hotter-than-usual summer, local media reported.

09

Despite fears, 3D printing has positive effects on global trade

phys.org

3-D printing technology enables economies to produce goods locally, so conventional wisdom has been that it would dramatically reduce international trade; however, new University of California San Diego and World Bank research presents…

Quantum annealing can beat classical computing in limited cases

phys.org

Recent research proves that under certain conditions, quantum annealing computers can run algorithms—including the well-known Shor's algorithm—more quickly than classical computers. In most cases, however, quantum annealing does not…

Study: Individuals value information as they do material objects

phys.org

Technology has enabled the creation of a vast and growing amount of information, leading to benefits (e.g., more data to learn from) as well as drawbacks (e.g., the spread of fake news and conspiracy theories). New research sought to…

Tuesday, Aug 16

22

Expert discusses why gas prices still high despite oil getting cheaper—and what will happen next

phys.org

While thermometers have been well into the red across the northern hemisphere, people are panicking about the cost of energy bills once winter starts to bite. According to the latest forecasts in the UK, the minimum price cap for…

20

Oil majors' climate visions 'inconsistent' with Paris targets

phys.org

Global decarbonisation scenarios envisioned by oil and gas majors are incompatible with the Paris climate deal temperature goals aimed at averting devastating heating, according to research published Tuesday.